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Cory is not doing well

September 15th, 2010 Leave a comment Go to comments

Hey guys, I know nobody likes bad news. And I struggled with whether or not to post this update because I don’t want to ruin anyone’s day who has been following Cory. But I decided that it would be untrue to this blog, Cory, and his fans to hide the truth.

Cory’s last days are probably upon us.

Cory’s miracle at the lake was truly a miracle but we’re beginning to see that it was really Cory’s last stand; his last hurrah at the things in life that he loves so much.

We plan to have a family meeting tonight to determine Cory’s fate but we are all pretty sure of what needs to happen next. We have consulted with Cory’s surgeon, his vet, and Gary, founder of Cory’s favorite food (Darwin’s Natural Pet Food).

I don’t want to give anyone any false illusions about Cory’s health, so here’s the scoop:

The pool isn’t helping him. We have been giving him 30 minutes of pool-time each night in the hopes that we could rehab his hind legs and soothe his arthritis pain. Unfortunately, he seems to be on a slippery slope that just isn’t getting better.

He’s unable to stand on his own, so he lays idle all day waiting for us to get home from work. He favors his right hind leg to the point that he’s trying to walk on only three legs, and he just doesn’t have the strength to do so. His left hind leg is atrophying badly and he doesn’t even use it while swimming, as we had hoped.

His senses are sharp and his mind is clear but he is giving us signs that he can’t take much more of this. At some point we need to decide whether we compassionately help him end his suffering. And that’s what we will discuss tonight.

When Cory’s time comes, we will continue to run this blog, and Cory’s Story will live on. Only weeks away from publishing, we had hoped that Cory would make it to the launch of his book but it’s looking unlikely that he will.

This blog will live on to serve as a resource to dogs suffering from canine epilepsy and cauda equina syndrome, because Cory showed that they can be overcome. We will vigorously promote Cory’s Story to help all dogs live longer, happier, healthier lives. At 13.5 years old, Cory has already well outlived his expected lifespan for a Labrador Retriever, especially one suffering from epilepsy and cauda equina syndrome.

We’ll keep you all updated as we move through this difficult process. We appreciate all your love and support so far and Cory knows you are thinking of him.

I’m going to share a poem that we read for the first time on the wall of Cory’s veterinarian clinic years ago. At the time, we couldn’t imagine this ever applying to Cory:

A DOG’S PLEA

Treat me kindly, my beloved friend, for not heart in all the world is more grateful for kindness than the loving heart of me.

Do not break my spirit with a stick for though I should lick your hand between blows, your patience and understanding will more quickly teach me the things you would have me learn.

Speak to me often, for your voice is the world’s sweetest music, as you must know by the fierce wagging of my tail when your footstep falls upon my waiting ear.

Please take me inside when it is cold and wet, for I am a domesticated animal, no longer accustomed to the bitter elements. I ask no greater glory than the privilege of sitting at your feet beside the hearth.

Keep my pan filled with fresh water, for I cannot tell you when I suffer thirst.

Feed me clean food that I may stay well, to romp and play and do your bidding, to walk by your side and stand ready, willing and able to protect you with my life, should your life be in danger.

AND, MY FRIEND, WHEN I AM VERY OLD, AND I NO LONGER ENJOY GOOD HEALTH, HEARING AND SIGHT, DO NOT MAKE HEROIC EFFORTS TO KEEP ME GOING. I AM NOT HAVING ANY FUN. PLEASE SEE THAT MY TRUSTING LIFE IS TAKEN GENTLY. I SHALL LEAVE THIS EARTH KNOWING WITH THE LAST BREATH I DRAW THAT MY FATE WAS ALWAYS SAFEST IN YOUR HANDS.

(Author Unknown)

The pet we loved will remain with us forever, and cherished memories will abide within our hearts reminding us that the love we shared together is eternal.

Canine Epilepsy: An Owner's Guide to Understanding & Living with Canine Seizures

This guide will help you and your canine companion deal with canine epilepsy. You'll learn how to detect symptoms of an upcoming seizure, treat during and after a seizure, and prevent future seizures.

Ready to read Cory's Story? Read Chapter 1 Now.

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  • Marionleonard

    Hi Sandy…I so agree with the poem you enclosed…Though Cory is such a part of your family and lives he does deserve to be treated with compassion….we had to consider that with Morty when the time came and the grief is and will be almost overwhelming…know that your friends are thinking about you and praying for you… and how awesome is it that you started Cory's Story and have a continuing legacy…Blessings my friend and thanks for Cory's Story.

  • SCLiberal

    I just found your site from a Facebook post and have not read everything so forgive me if this has already been covered. Have you tried having a raindrop technique done on him? It involves using Young Living essential oils up and down the spine. There are many YL oilers out there who can do it. It has really helped a lot of animals, from dogs to horses. One of the most knowledgeable is Sue Olmos: http://www.mybestfriendstherapy.com/
    My thoughts are with you. I lost two of my dogs last year and I know how hard it is to lose a good friend.

  • iphlogiston

    Oh my. I just found this site. While I don't regard myself as a dog-lover (I'm more of a cat person,) I nearly wept at this news and the poem. I am so sorry to hear that this might be the end. I've lost many beloved pets in my time and I can say it is never easy. My thoughts and best wishes to all in this difficult time.