Archive

This is the Archive for the ‘Pictures of Cory’ Category. It contains all blog posts related to Pictures of Cory.

Cauda Equina Syndrome: Cory’s Incision After 15 Weeks

July 16th, 2010 1 comment

I just wanted to give an update on Cory’s back. This photo was taken about 15 weeks after he had surgery for Cauda Equina syndrome. As you’ll recall from an earlier post, we started using DERMagic skin care lotion to help speed the healing and hair regrowth process.

It’s definitely working. Take a look and you’ll notice a light layer of hair growing back almost all over the shaved area. Interestingly, you can also see some small patches of hair that seem to be growing faster than other areas. We’re hoping he gets his entire coat back soon!

cauda equina hair growing back

Canine Epilepsy: An Owner's Guide to Understanding & Living with Canine Seizures

This guide will help you and your canine companion deal with canine epilepsy. You'll learn how to detect symptoms of an upcoming seizure, treat during and after a seizure, and prevent future seizures.

Ready to read Cory's Story? Read Chapter 1 Now.

Cory Went Camping

July 8th, 2010 2 comments

We went camping over the 4th of July weekend.  Cory got to swim in a lake and dry himself off by the campfire.  He was delighted to be strong enough to do the things he loves to do the most!

Canine Epilepsy: An Owner's Guide to Understanding & Living with Canine Seizures

This guide will help you and your canine companion deal with canine epilepsy. You'll learn how to detect symptoms of an upcoming seizure, treat during and after a seizure, and prevent future seizures.

Ready to read Cory's Story? Read Chapter 1 Now.

Categories: Pictures of Cory, Updates on Cory Tags:

A recent photo of Cory

June 13th, 2010 2 comments

Cory is starting to enjoy his toys again!

Cory with a toy

Cory with a toy

Canine Epilepsy: An Owner's Guide to Understanding & Living with Canine Seizures

This guide will help you and your canine companion deal with canine epilepsy. You'll learn how to detect symptoms of an upcoming seizure, treat during and after a seizure, and prevent future seizures.

Ready to read Cory's Story? Read Chapter 1 Now.

Categories: Pictures of Cory, Updates on Cory Tags:

Cory 9 Weeks after Cauda Equina Syndrome

May 28th, 2010 2 comments

Just a quick update to show you a picture of Cory’s back, taken on May 27th, 2010 (about 9 weeks after surgery for cauda equina syndrome). His scar is showing tremendous improvement, and the DERMagic Skin Rescue Lotion appears to be starting to work some of its magic as well. It’s hard to see in the photo, but hairs are sprouting up all over the bare area. We’re staying hopeful he’ll get his shiny coat back soon!

Cory 9 weeks after cauda equina syndrome surgery

Cory 9 weeks after cauda equina syndrome surgery

Canine Epilepsy: An Owner's Guide to Understanding & Living with Canine Seizures

This guide will help you and your canine companion deal with canine epilepsy. You'll learn how to detect symptoms of an upcoming seizure, treat during and after a seizure, and prevent future seizures.

Ready to read Cory's Story? Read Chapter 1 Now.

Cory Wants to Say “Hi” To His Friends

May 4th, 2010 3 comments

I took this photo of Cory last night.  He likes it when I let him babysit his beloved tennis ball.  He is not yet able to chase after it.  It has now been 5 weeks since his surgery for Cauda Equina (ruptured disks).  He is so happy to be on the mend!

Canine Epilepsy: An Owner's Guide to Understanding & Living with Canine Seizures

This guide will help you and your canine companion deal with canine epilepsy. You'll learn how to detect symptoms of an upcoming seizure, treat during and after a seizure, and prevent future seizures.

Ready to read Cory's Story? Read Chapter 1 Now.

Pictures of Cory 3 weeks after Cauda Equina surgery

April 19th, 2010 4 comments

These pictures are of Cory 3 weeks after Cauda Equina surgery. His back was shaved for the surgery and his hair is slowly growing back. But it seems to be growing back very slowly.

cauda equina surgery

cauda equina surgery

cauda equina surgery

cauda equina surgery 2

cauda equina surgery

cauda equina surgery 3

cauda equina surgery

cauda equina surgery 4

Canine Epilepsy: An Owner's Guide to Understanding & Living with Canine Seizures

This guide will help you and your canine companion deal with canine epilepsy. You'll learn how to detect symptoms of an upcoming seizure, treat during and after a seizure, and prevent future seizures.

Ready to read Cory's Story? Read Chapter 1 Now.

Quick check-in and some pictures of Cory

April 14th, 2010 3 comments

Hi everyone! I spoke with Sandy today, who told me that Cory got his stitches out yesterday, but that he’s having some unusual symptoms which may or may not be related to the surgery. She said that he wasn’t very excited about breakfast this morning, and even thought about it for a while before actually eating. This is very unlike Cory. Fortunately, once he decided to eat, he gobbled it up just like always.

She described his mood thereafter as somber and seemingly wanting to be left alone. He has been napping in the guest bedroom recently, which is rare for him, considering that he usually loves to be wherever everyone else is. I suggested that his brain chemistry may be a little off (he may be feeling symptoms of depression) due to all the stress he’s been going through, so I wondered aloud if there is a “happy pill” for dogs.

A light bulb went on in Sandy’s head and she went to the store and bought some St. John’s Wort, which purportedly is best known for it’s antianxiety effects, but can also be used as a pain reliever in conditions such as intervertebral disk disease. We’ll do a test run with it and keep you all informed on whether or not it works.

Now, just for fun, here are some more pictures from Cory’s glory days =)

Cory swimming

Cory swimming

Cory Swimming 2

Cory Swimming at Lake Roesiger

Canine Epilepsy: An Owner's Guide to Understanding & Living with Canine Seizures

This guide will help you and your canine companion deal with canine epilepsy. You'll learn how to detect symptoms of an upcoming seizure, treat during and after a seizure, and prevent future seizures.

Ready to read Cory's Story? Read Chapter 1 Now.

Pictures from Cory’s return home

April 2nd, 2010 4 comments

I don’t even know where to begin… Cory’s return home last night was nothing short of shocking for myself, Jay, and Sandy. Cory wasn’t the vegetable that we had all experienced in the previous two days… his turnaround was seemingly miraculous to us all.

He was Cory. Our Cory.

Perky, excited, happy, engaging, and alive.

That’s how he was. How he went from being unable to even move his body to back to his old self completely blew us away. We knew he was a fighter, but his recovery was absolutely amazing.

We brought him home with a pair of support “shorts” that the doctor gave us to support his hind end while he recovers from surgery. He isn’t supposed to be allowed to walk on non-carpeted surfaces because he might slip and fall, which could reinjure his spine while it recovers from surgery.

Here are some pictures of the shorts:

Cory in shorts

Cory in shorts

Cory in shorts

Cory's shorts

Cory in shorts

Another shot

After about 10 minutes, we took his shorts off and allowed him to walk freely (as he was obviously becoming quite annoyed by the fact that we had to support him wherever he wanted to go). We got him onto the carpet and watched him as he took a few wobbly steps.

We took turns sitting at either side of the room and calling him to us, rewarding him with treats when he reached us. This was exactly how we trained him to come when called as a puppy.

Of course, he loved the game, and after a few rounds he noticeably improved his coordination. He had trouble turning around and backing up, but the doctor told us that the benefits of the surgery should become quite apparent after 4 weeks, when the swelling and inflamation in his spine has disappeared.

After a while, he wanted to lay down, but this posed quite a problem for him. He tried to lay down, but was obviously feeling a little unwieldy in his hind end, so he would stop and just stand back up. We watched him eagerly as he tried a few more times to lay down, being unsuccessful. Sandy tried to help him physically, but that only confused him and made him less willing to try.

After a few more attempts, he got a great idea: he leaned up against the couch while he lowered himself down to the laying position. We thought that was quite smart of him =)

Here’s our happy boy enjoying his first relaxing moments back home. Doesn’t he look happy?

Cory grinning

Cory grinning

home at last

Home at last

I also shot a video of Cory so you can see his movement. I’ll post it later… all for now!

Canine Epilepsy: An Owner's Guide to Understanding & Living with Canine Seizures

This guide will help you and your canine companion deal with canine epilepsy. You'll learn how to detect symptoms of an upcoming seizure, treat during and after a seizure, and prevent future seizures.

Ready to read Cory's Story? Read Chapter 1 Now.

Photos from my visit with Cory last night

March 31st, 2010 4 comments

Last night around 9:30pm I decided to visit Cory. He’s in an animal hospital about 25 minutes from where I live, so I took the drive out there, feeling both nervous and excited at the same time. I had visions of him walking over to me, wagging his tail as soon as he saw me and burying his head in my hands during a joyful reunion. Unfortunately, my expectations were far too high.

I waited in a small examination room for them to bring Cory in. After about a half hour, a man brought Cory into the room, carrying him in his arms, and he laid Cory down on a pillow in the room. I stayed for about 45 minutes as I got down on the floor to pet him, talk with him, and tell him about all the fun things he can look forward to doing.

His body stayed motionless the entire time; he was only able to move his eyes. Twice he tried to lift his head but was only able to move it about an inch. He was heavily drugged on pain killers and extremely sedated, but he stayed awake and looked at me while I talked to him.

I noted that when I mentioned some of his favorite words like “go to the park,” “go for a swim,” “play,” and “mommy and daddy,” his eyes lit up, became wider and his eyebrows lifted. So I know he was listening and I definitely had his attention.

I called Jay and Sandy and put them on speaker phone so they could talk to Cory. He looked at the phone and listened intently, then peacefully fell asleep. I waited with him for a few more minutes, then told the staff that he had fallen asleep. They took him back to his bed and I went home.

I felt a mixture of emotions; sadness and satisfaction. It was very difficult to see Cory in such a state, but I also think he gained a great sense of peace from my reassurances that everything would be better soon. It’s going to be really tough to get through this difficult time but we are looking ahead to the summer when Cory has his hind legs back. The doctor says he’ll be able to do the things he loves to do again by summer time.

Here are some pictures from the visit last night. I told him about all the words of encouragement and love from you all, and he wants you to know that he’s a fighter and will come through this.

Cory after surgery

Cory after surgery

Cory after surgery

Cory after surgery, from farther away

The incision along Cory's spine

The incision along Cory's spine

Canine Epilepsy: An Owner's Guide to Understanding & Living with Canine Seizures

This guide will help you and your canine companion deal with canine epilepsy. You'll learn how to detect symptoms of an upcoming seizure, treat during and after a seizure, and prevent future seizures.

Ready to read Cory's Story? Read Chapter 1 Now.

Doggy lifejackets

March 12th, 2010 No comments

Ever since Cory’s grand maul seizure (which Sandy explains in vivid detail in the upcoming book, Cory’s Story), Cory has had to wear a lifejacket when he swims. Dogs with epilepsy have been known to have seizures in the water, which often result in tragic endings. Cory doesn’t mind his lifejacket at all, but whenever we take Cory to the beach to go swimming, he usually gets some raised eyebrows from people.

“What is that?”

“Does he have to wear that because he gets cold?”

“Dogs can swim just fine you know”

etc…

Cory’s proud of his lifejacket, so here are some stylin’ pictures of him sporting his gear.

Cory wearing his lifejacket

Cory wearing his lifejacket

Cory in his lifejacket

Cory in his lifejacket

Has your dog ever worn a lifejacket? What would you think if you saw a dog wearing one? Leave a comment and let me know!

Canine Epilepsy: An Owner's Guide to Understanding & Living with Canine Seizures

This guide will help you and your canine companion deal with canine epilepsy. You'll learn how to detect symptoms of an upcoming seizure, treat during and after a seizure, and prevent future seizures.

Ready to read Cory's Story? Read Chapter 1 Now.

Categories: Dog seizures, Pictures of Cory Tags: